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Frederick S. Jones House - Calder Edmonton

Frederick S. Jones Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

Frederick S. Jones Residence is located at 13067 115 Street on a massive lot in Calder. This house is surrounded by matured properties and lowrise buildings near the Grand Trunk Fitness and Leisure Centre in north-central Edmonton.



The Frederick S. Jones Residence was built in 1926 as a one and one-half story clinker brick home with a side-facing gable roof and two single-story hipped roof projections on the northwest and southwest corners. It is located on the corner of a residential street and occupies four city lots. The municipal designation includes the exterior of the house. The interior and the landscaping features are considered non-contributing elements.


This northwest property is also valued as reflecting the workmanship of a master bricklayer. The house was built in 1926 by Frederick S. Jones, a talented bricklayer who was involved in the construction of several high-profile buildings in Edmonton, including the clinker brick masterpiece Holy Trinity Church. Similar to Holy Trinity, Jones used his skill and experience as a bricklayer to incorporate large, misshapen pieces of clinker brick to achieve a unique look for his house. These details show Jones’s mastery of his craft and are present in the best examples of his work. The skilled use of clinker brick makes this Calder house an excellent example of one of Edmonton’s few vernacular styles of construction.


The character-defining elements of the Frederick S. Jones Residence are expressed for the elements of the clinker brick exterior, side-gable roof with hipped roof projections, central window in the gable ends with a stucco surround, supported by dentilation brick details from the main floor level, exposed rafters, and tongue, and groove wooden boards under eaves, front entrance stairs with clinker brick on the side and covered porch, timber front door and tripartite windows with 6 over 1 double-hung wooden sash windows.


Frederick S. Jones, who built this house in 1926 from plans obtained through New York-based magazine The Touchstone, a popular means of obtaining building plans during the early 20th century.


He began cultivating 40 acres around this property shortly after his arrival in Edmonton in 1904. In 1905 Jones planted white spruce on his property, which still stands just behind the home. This tree received a plaque in 2007 from the Heritage Tree Foundation in recognition of its historical value as part of the Alberta Heritage Tree Project.


The home has since remained in the Jones family and is currently occupied by Jones’ granddaughter, a well-known horticulturist, and instructor in the Faculty of Agriculture at the University of Alberta. For more information or to learn the value of your northwest Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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Data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton.