Cecil S. Burgess Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The Cecil S. Buress Residence is located at 10958 - 89 Avenue, Edmonton T6G 0Z6 in the Garneau community in south-central Edmonton. The Craftsman-style architecture represented by this historical Edmonton house was popular during the time of its construction, circa 1912. Design elements include the gable roof configuration, side dormers, central brick chimney, triangular eave brackets, wooden double-hung windows, and the hipped-roof open verandah with solid handrails. Of special note is the symmetrical arrangement of upper floor main windows and corner ‘eye’ windows in the front façade. The house is significant because of its associations with Cecil Scott Burgess (1870 – 1971) and Percival Sidney Warren (1890 – 1970).



Mr. Burgess lived here from 1941. He joined the University of Alberta in 1913 when he was appointed resident architect and professor of architecture. He designed and supervised the construction of many early campus buildings including the Arts Building, Pembina Hall, and the staff Ring Houses. His legacy is further evident in the Rutherford Library and the Students’ Union Building, which was designed by his students. Mr. Burgess’s influence was felt beyond the borders of the University of Alberta campus. For 30 years he a member of the Council of the Alberta Association of Architects. He designed the Bowker Building and the Birks Building, recognized as significant contributions to this city’s architecture.


He was also Chairman of the city Town Planning Commission, where he was instrumental in acquiring land for the town center and in setting aside the parcels of land that city community leagues now develop and use for community and recreational needs. After his retirement from the University, Mr. Burgess continued in private practice and was retained by the National Parks Authority to develop plans for the towns of Banff and Jasper.


Dr. Warren and his family lived at this address from 1926 to 1940. He was a distinguished geologist who joined the University of Alberta in 1920 as a founding member of the Geology Department and acted as its chair from 1949 to 1950. His research focused on Alberta stratigraphy and western Canadian fossils, one of which bears his name. He built the extensive biostratigraphic collection at the University and published widely on the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks of western Canada. He was often consulted during the post-War oil exploration boom and his work provided one of the cornerstones for the building of the petroleum industry in Alberta. He was active with the Research Council of Alberta and with the Geological Society of Canada. The P.S. Warren Society, the student geological society at the University of Alberta, was named in his honor.


The house is also significant because it was part of the early development of Garneau, one of our oldest settled neighborhoods dating from before the First World War. This community was built in association with the University of Alberta as it served university employees, affluent business people, and civil servants who worked nearby and across the river in the Legislature community.


The house is beautifully maintained and the pride of the period in which it was built with the original veranda and a welcoming foyer with staircase offers a glimpse into a gorgeous main floor that is really functional yet elegant. Beautiful windows, wood-burning fireplace, an entertaining-sized dining room, and a flex room/ mudroom off of an upgraded kitchen. Laundry on the main floor and stainless appliances offer modern convenience. The second floor features large bedrooms, generous windows with treetop views from all sides of the house. A full bath w/ clawfoot tub is delightful.


The backyard is lovely with a back porch and a historic elm. Truly a beauty. The basement offers two more bedrooms, a second kitchen, and a modern bath with a shower. Totally turn-key and a pleasure to own! This house also has an American Elm in its backyard that has one of the largest diameters in all of Edmonton at 1.24 meters. was last sold in 2016 for $719,000. For more information or to learn the value of your Gareau Edmonton home, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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Bard Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The Bard Residence is located at 10544 - 84 Avenue between Strathcona and Garneau in south-central Edmonton across from the Old Scona Academic school.



On May 21, 1912, Delmar Bard obtained a building permit to construct this wonderful grand neo-Georgian-style home. The permit listed Mr. Bard as the contractor and Mr. L. Keith as an architect and the cost was estimated at $6,500. Once completed this two-and-a-half-story, 4,600 square foot residence has an attached conservatory and a carriage house with second-floor living quarters. The solid massing and symmetrically composed front façade with a central entry and full open veranda is a beautiful representation of the elaborate foursquare architectural style that was popular in the privileged classes between about 1910 and 1925.


The interior of this Architectural foursquare style home is lavishly furnished with period stained glass windows imported from France. Fine oak woodwork is found throughout the home and the ceilings are trimmed with detailed molding. Built-in bookcases, leatherette wallpaper, and some period light fixtures add to the charm of this residence. One main feature of the home is a built-in central vacuum system. Also, he installed an automobile turntable in front of the garage so he would not have to reverse his vehicle out of the driveway. This has since been removed.


Following Delmar’s death in 1938, the home was subdivided into suites. These divisions were later removed by Sue Bard, granddaughter of the original owner. Recently sold, the residence is undergoing further restorations and has been added to the Register of Historic Resources for the City of Edmonton.


Original features inside the home include oak woodwork, built-in furniture, stained glass windows imported from France, original plumbing fixtures, and the original, intact gas fireplace. The flat-roofed conservatory includes a feature fanlight and sidelights adjoining both front and side entrances. Enduring original features on the large, gable-roofed carriage house include a cupola, feed chutes for the horses in the stables, a cistern, and hinged wooden doors for loading hay in the loft.


The Bard Residence was last sold in 2004 prior to our real estate boom. At the time, this Edmonton house sold for $579,000. For more information or to learn the value of your Strathcona Edmonton home, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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Sarah McLellan Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

This house located at 11135 - 84 Avenue, constructed by Tom Leake, was built in 1913 and then valued at $4,500. It is one of the original, unaltered structures still remaining in Garneau Edmonton. Sarah McLellan emigrated from Scotland in 1906 and purchased the lot from Laurent Garneau in 1907. He was the farmer who owned most of the land on which the University of Alberta is now located.



This south Edmonton house is a larger version of the foursquare architectural style home with Arts and Crafts characteristics. Its design is one of the simple hipped properties. It features a hipped dormer window on each elevation in the roof, with the north and south dormers containing two sash windows while the east dormer contains a smaller casement window. The windows on the remaining elevations are sash windows, with notable casings and corniced crowning. The walls are sided at ground level in cedar lap siding and the upper level in plain cedar shakes. The two are separated by a timber board belt course, over which the shingles slightly project. The front upper elevation has a decorative pattern in the shingles enhanced by the use of diamond-shaped shingles. A frieze board under the eaves joins the walls and roof.


The east elevation also has a two-story projecting window bay, with the bay extending through the foundation. The front of the house has a veranda with slender, slightly tapered piers supporting the upper-level porch. The piers and posts are filled with crafted wood railings, posts, caps, and bracketing. All decorative features including moldings and spindle fluting remain. An indication that decorative wood bracketing existed between the piers has been noted. These have been replaced with replicated brackets true to the patterns manufactured by the Winnipeg Window and Door Company in 1912 – 1914 and were commonly used at that time. The base of the veranda is covered with wooden square lattices common to the period. The rear porch is similar to the front but does not extend the width of the building. A brick chimney projects from the top of the roof.


Despite its varied use over the years, the interior of the house has remained intact and is complete with original millwork, including five-panel doors, wainscoting, stairwell construction, moldings, and trim. Almost all of the original fir and maple flooring remains as do the fireplace and grillwork. From 1916 to 1922, the house was used as a nurses’ residence for the nurses working with First World War casualties at the military hospital that was located where the University of Alberta Hospital stands today.


This University area home was sold on the Edmonton Real Estate MLS board for $97,000 in 1987, then again in 2000 for $225,000. Today it is valued over $1,228,000.For more information or to learn the value of your Garneau Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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Margaret Martin Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The Strathcona Edmonton Margaret Martin Residence is located at 8324 106 Street NW in the heart of the community. Margaret Martin owned a 320-acre farm on this site at the turn of the 20th century. In 1899 Margaret and her husband, David, left their North Dakota home to settle in the Canadian northwest. David set off with livestock and farm machinery in April to secure the land, and Margaret followed in July with their 11 children. Sadly, one small daughter died of pneumonia shortly after they arrived. Eighteen months later, David died of the same illness. The family buried both loved ones on their farm, at what is now Mount Pleasant Cemetery.



Margaret commissioned the architectural firm of Magoon, Hopkins, and James to design this foursquare, Prairie-style home in 1907. The firm later became Magoon and MacDonald Associates that built the Metals Building, Tegler Building, McDougall United Church, Salvation Army Citadel, St. Stephen’s College, and other city landmarks. This Edmonton home features a bell-cast flared roof, bracketed eaves, quoining details on the edges, curved dormers, bay windows, a wrap-around veranda, and multi-paned windows throughout.


The Martin family moved into what was then 18 Second Street West, Strathcona, the only house on the west side of the street until 1910. The remaining area of Martin Estates, the name given to the newly subdivided farmland, eventually became the communities of Pleasantview and Parkallen.


Margaret died in 1940, leaving the home in her daughter Edith’s care. The Martin children created their own legacy in Edmonton. Grace Martin (now named for a Mill Woods school) McEachern became a well-known school teacher. Helen Martin married Cecil Rutherford, the only son of Alberta’s first premier, A.C. Rutherford. David Quincy Martin worked for thirty years with the Alberta Liquor Control Board after marrying Lova Shaw, daughter of H.V. Shaw, proprietor of Edmonton Cigar Factory.


This rare find is truly a heritage home in the City of Edmonton and was sold for only $365,000 in 2005. By 2014, this Old Strathcona changed hands again for a sold price of $750,000.For more information or to learn the value of your Strathcona Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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Lord Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The Lord Residence was designed, owned, and built by George Lord Architect and his wife Nancy Lord. It is located at 11748 University Avenue in the prestigious community of Windsor Park near the University of Alberta and was featured in the 1957 Canadian Homes & Garden magazine.



Designed by George Lord and inspired by the West Coast Regionalism Style, This south Edmonton home features a low horizontal profile with large expanses of glass to engage the house with the surrounding environment. The large windows bring light deep into the house with clerestory windows at the ends of a long sloping roof. Rustic cedar siding was commonly used by Rule Wynn and Rule for their residential type buildings. Lord was employed in this firm at the time and later became a partner under the new name Rule Wynn Forbes Lord. The Lord House color scheme is original, with brown stained wood siding and green trims, and was typical of the firm’s approach to their West Coast Style buildings, most of which have been altered over the years. This house plan is unique, with living areas on the upper floor and bedrooms on the lower level to take advantage of the spectacular view over the river valley.


In 2015, this historically significant Windsor Park home sold for $751,000 by one of our best Remax Realtors. For more information or to learn the value of your Windsor Park Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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John Walker Barnett House

Historical Edmonton Homes

The John Walker Barnett House is located across from the Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Strathcona Edmonton at 10701 University Avenue. The heritage value of this south-central house home lies in its association with John Walker Barnett, a founder and the first General Secretary-Treasurer / Executive Secretary of the Alberta Teachers’ Association.



John Walker Barnett was born on August 28, 1880, in Lincolnshire, England. He trained as a teacher and, while teaching in England, served as a district president of the National Union of Teachers of England and Wales. In early 1911, he migrated to Canada and in September 1914, Barnett had a house built in the Queen Alexandra neighborhood.


Soon after this purchase, he moved his family from northern Edmonton to the new house, which was only eight blocks southwest of the high school. The one-and-a-half-story house is a Craftsman-style bungalow with an open floor plan interior. It has wood-shingle-clad exterior walls, exposed eaves, large decorative brackets, and a large gable-roofed veranda. The interior features large quantities of natural wood elements, such as the wood strip flooring, exposed wooden beams, fireplace mantles, large doorways with wooden columns, built in seating benches, and cabinetry. Craftsman-style houses such as this were popular at the time and the scale of the house is typical for an urban, middle-class family.


Encouraged by his experience with teachers’ unions in England, Barnett became involved in efforts to develop a stronger and more unified voice for Alberta teachers. In 1915, he led the Edmonton Teachers’ Association’s protest against salary cuts. Between 1920 and 1924, the ATA operated out of Barnett’s University Edmonton home. During the early years of the ATA, Barnett concentrated on increasing membership and lobbying the government for better working conditions. Following the election of the Social Credit government of William Aberhart – who was a former high school teacher – the ATA won a number of important concessions. In 1936, the government amended the Teaching Profession Act making membership in the ATA mandatory for all public school teachers. Long-term contracts and pensions were secured and in 1941, the ATA became the first teachers’ association in Canada to gain the right to collective bargaining and the right to legally strike. Barnett’s determination and effort were instrumental to the achievement of these long-sought-after goals.


John Walker Barnett lived in the University Avenue house until April 1946. Five months later he resigned from the ATA, although he continued to serve as an advisor until his death in June 1947. The residence’s style and floor plan retain considerable integrity from the period in which the Barnett family was in residence. This University area Edmonton house sold in 1991 for $141,800. For more information or to learn the value of your Strathcona Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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George Harcourt Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The George Harcourt Residence is located in the prestigious community of Windsor Park near the University of Alberta at 9127 117 Street NW. It is significant for its association with the development of Windsor Park and its Foursquare design.



As one of the first houses constructed in Windsor Park, the George Harcourt Residence is significant as an uncommon example of early residential development in the neighborhood built circa 1909. The land around the south Edmonton home was purchased in 1910 and remained largely undeveloped until after the Second World War.


The George Harcourt Residence is valued for its Foursquare design. The Foursquare design was common during the first two decades of the 20th century. Typical four square characteristics of this home include the hipped roof with a wide-hipped dormer at the front of the house, the overhanging eaves with decorative eaves brackets, and the contrasting shingle and clapboard cladding. Geometrically patterned windows are also characteristic of the Foursquare design, exhibited in the diamond pattern mullions of the George Harcourt Residence, as are the two broad, flat chimneys. The single ionic column supporting the front porch is a less common feature, as Foursquare homes typically incorporate square porch supports.


This charming character Windsor Park home radiates throughout with 1920 vintage. It was sold by one of our Edmonton Remax Realtors after our last real estate crash in 2008 for $690,000. Then again in 2015 for $916,500with a quality professionally finished basement with In-floor heating, newer boiler system, new sewer line & water lines, upgraded electrical ,and cedar shingles by another Edmonton Remax Realtor. For more information or to learn the value of your Windsor Park Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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George Durrand Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The George Durrand Residence is located at 10417 Saskatchewan Drive, Strathcona, Edmonton, Alberta. It is in a mixed real estate community with properties of the same era to brand new infill houses to low and high-rise buildings.



The Durrand Residence is a prominent Edwardian structure that is representative of a substantial type of domestic structure inhabited by the upper-middle class near the University. Built by the owner for his own requirements in 1913, it was constructed with a scale and presence necessary to fit into the genteel atmosphere created by the city’s emerging commercial, cultural and political group. This house is very solidly built, as would be expected from an endeavour undertaken by a family working in construction and carpentry.


This Strathcona house is a two and one-half storey brick dwelling built in an Edwardian style with architectural features include a bell-cast hip roof and brick walls faced with red stretcher bond brick and detailed with sandstone sills and rusticated stone quoins. The front entry porch, once an important visual element of the structure, has six columns resting on square brick piers. The bay windows with sandstone headers have not been altered in any significant way.


The Durrand Residence is valued for its association with the Durrand family, who were representative of the type of entrepreneurial and professional families that began to populate the city of Strathcona early in the twentieth century. The house was later home to Harold Gould Macdonald, a noted Edmontonian and founder of the H.G. Macdonald Company of contractors that have grown into the well-recognized firm of Christensen and Macdonald, still active to this day. He lived in the house until 1923. It is important to understand the growth, development, and socio-economic values associated with Strathcona prior to the First World War. A neighbourhood of affluent upper-middle-class citizens, the social aspirations of many of its prominent residents is reflected in strong, formal and stylish architecture.


At some point prior to its last MLS sale in 2000, the 2 1/2 storey heritage brick house was converted to offices with a full basement. It was sold as a commercial building in 2000 by one of our Remax Real Estate Agents for $310,000. Today, it is assessed at $693,000 as non-residential. For more information or to learn the value of your Strathcona Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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What classifies as a luxury Edmonton home?

Luxury home prices vary from city to province to state to country. What classifies a home in the luxury market consists of a few variables. Luxury homes are no longer based on price alone. To classify property into the luxury home category, it mush have desired indulgences. A home can be considered "a luxury property" when it offers these features:



  • A grand foyer with soaring ceilings to greet your guests.
  • Adequate nanny/guest living quarters which are private and away from the main living area.
  • Personal conveniences and amenities such as pools, in-home gyms, Imax movie theatres, arcade rooms, wine cellars, decontamination showers, backyard tennis courts, solarium, and game rooms. There are several homes in Edmonton with personal amenities which can be found in Cameron Heights and Glenora.
  • State of the art kitchens. With duel ovens, smart refrigerators to keep track of your food items, wine storage, ample counter space, built-in computer screens.
  • Technology. Homes controlled with voice activation or the touch of a bottom from anywhere in the world are now one of the must-haves with elite buyers.
  • Privacy. Many elite home buyers require privacy, especially media icons who get accosted by paparazzi.
  • A prime location. A view is one of the things that make homes fall into the luxury category no matter where you live. It can be an unobstructed view of a mountain, beachfront, or overlooking the sparkling lights of the city. Beachfront properties in Edmonton can be found in Summerside.
  • Premier quality, reputable builders and renowned architect. The construction materials, lighting, finishes, appliances, and design all must be a cut above what's considered standard. Dominate renowned Edmonton communities include Griesbach and Windermere.

A luxury home can mean different things to different people. Bottom line, a luxury home is where you can relax and retreat from the rest of the world, enjoying a dwelling that fits your lifestyle. View our Edmonton luxury homes for sale by the district. 

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