Samuels Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The Samuels Residence is located in the Glenora area at 13842 Ravine Drive. It was designed by McKernan and Bouey Architects. The original owners were Joseph and Fanny Samuels. The Samuels Residence was built in the newly developing neighborhood of Capitol Hill in Glenora. It was a showpiece of the new modernism that was emerging in home design, particularly with its flat room and rectangular forms and volumes.



This west-central house incorporates large expanses of glass that accentuate the relationship of the inside to the outdoors. Light also falls deep into the house through a row of continuous clerestory windows. An angled plan that conforms to the property lines creates a deep, front entrance garden recess, which draws visitors into the house. The landscaping around the house makes use of the Mugo pines which were added later and were popular in the mid-century Modern period to provide visual privacy.


There is no MLS real estate sale activity on this Glenora home. It is currently assessed by the city at $1,091,000. For more information or to learn the value of your Glenora Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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William Blakey Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The William Blakey house is located in Glenora at 13526 101 Avenue NW near other prime real estate and other historical west-central Edmonton houses.



William Blakey was one of Edmonton’s most influential architects. He arrived in our city in 1907 following his brother and fellow architect, Richard, to the rapidly growing city. While Richard rose to become Provincial Architect from 1912 to 1924, William worked mostly in private practice. A number of his early buildings survive including Christ Church Anglican Church, Highlands United Church, the Masonic Temple, and the Garneau Theatre. Several of these buildings have since been demolished including the old Edmonton Journal building and the T. Eaton store.


By the 1940s Blakey’s ideas on architecture were evolving, and he became a firm supporter of modernism in building design and construction. He designed several strongly modernist churches such as St. Anthony’s and St. Agnes for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese and schools for the Edmonton Separate School Board. He also designed this Glenora house for his family in 1946 to reflect his advocacy of slab grade construction and other innovations in construction methods and materials. It features a symmetrical plan with a flat roof, large overhanging eaves, corner windows, and unornamented wall surfaces. These are all characteristic of the International Style, and this residence is one of Edmonton’s finest examples of this important architectural movement.


This prime location Edmonton house sold in 1996 for only $140,000. It was on the MLS market in 2013 with an asking price of $1,295,000. For more information or to learn the value of your Glenora Edmonton home, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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Dr L.A. Miller Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The Dr L.A. Miller Residence built by George Pradhan in 1938 is located at 13108 103 Avenue in the prestigious community of Glenora in west-central Edmonton.



This distinctive Streamline Moderne house is situated on Churchill Crescent in Glenora. Montreal businessman and developer James Carruthers bought land originally owned by Malcolm Groat and began to develop this west end neighbourhood in 1906. Carruthers named the area and placed a caveat on future development that dictated a high level of design standard. These regulations were implemented to ensure that Glenora would remain a prestigious development. It succeeded in its aim and very soon became an enclave of the professional and commercial elite of our municipality.


The first resident of this house was Dr L.A. Miller in 1937. The building permit is dated April 20, 1937, making this house a very early example of the Streamline Moderne Style in Edmonton. George Prudhamwas an active building and developer in the 1930s. In 1942 he incorporated Prudham Construction Ltd. and in 1944, he opened Prudham’s Lumber Yard south of Whyte Avenue. In 1949, he was elected as a Liberal MP for the west end.


This impressive residence is an excellent example of the Streamline Moderne Style that is typified by the use of strong horizontal composition, flat roofs, stucco walls, corner windows, continuous ‘speed lines’ in the stucco above the upper windows., curved entrance canopy with recessed entrance and an incorporated garage with a broad canopy that is supported on triple steel columns. The room above the garage is a sympathetic addition.


In addition to the Dr L.A. Miller Residence, there are several other Glenora homes constructed in the same time period, which feature the same high level of design standards. Like other historical Edmonton houses, there is no MLS sales history on this home. For more information or to learn the value of your Glenora  Edmonton home, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Read more about the history of Glenora Edmonton below:


Protected by an early 1900s regulation, Glenora has virtually no commercial or religious development and is home to some of the earliest estates in the city.


Malcolm Groat began working for the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) at age twenty-five after signing on in 1861 in his home country of Scotland. He was posted to Fort Edmonton and was put in charge of the farming operations and packhorses. In 1970, after the HBC selected their 3,000 land reserve around Fort Edmonton, Groat claimed 900 acres of land along the western edge of the reserve for himself and retired there in 1878 with his wife Marguerite, daughter of Chief Factor William Joseph Christie, and their nine children. His homestead was officially endorsed when Dominion Land Surveyors arrived in 1881. Their property stood from today’s 121 Street to 149 Street, and from the river valley to 111 Avenue.


The town of Edmonton was developing rapidly when Groat sold much of his property to a real estate developer in 1903. It changed hands again in 1906 when James Carruthers purchased it. He named the area on the west side of Groat Ravine ‘Glenora’ and decided early that this would be a prestigious area. Carruthers limited religious buildings and commercial development in the neighbourhood, instead of selling Glenora properties with the caveat that stated in part that “the houses to be erected on the said land shall be either detached or semi-detached and the sum to be expended on the erection of such house shall not be less than $3,500 [to] $5,000” depending on the particular lot. Carruthers also sold the new Alberta government land for the Lieutenant-Governor’s residence and invested in bridges across the ravines that separated Glenora from the new city of Edmonton. Council ran a streetcar line west in 1910 ultimately securing the success of the suburb. By the time the HBC sold off their reserve holdings in 1912 Glenora was home to many professionals; several of their original residences still stand with almost twenty listed as Edmonton Historic resources.


The neighbourhood is set apart due to Carruther’s caveats and the influence of the Garden City movement of the late nineteenth century. This trend promoted low-density residential lots and emphasized a parklike environment and the recreational use of areas like Groat Ravine. The sixteen grand homes facing Alexander Circle at 133 Street and 103 Avenue typify this movement. Likewise, the neighbourhood’s plan includes irregularly sized lots on streets that follow the flow and topography of the river valley and ravines, a sharp contrast to the grid system prevalent in the rest of the city. Some of Edmonton’s best architects were retained to design the period revival homes, post-war residences, and demonstration houses that populate Glenora.


From the outset, the neighbourhood was prescribed to be accessible to vehicles in part due to the relative distance of Glenora to downtown and the ability of its residents to afford such luxuries. Instead of relying upon a more common stable, for example, Dr Robert Wells, whose residence stands on Connaught Drive, built one of the first carriage houses in the city. Some of Edmonton’s first garages were also constructed in Glenora.


Although highly influenced by its proximity to the area’s first homes south of Stony Plain Road and east of 135 Street, development of the northern portion of the community in the early 1920s contrasted to “Old Glenora” and its protection under the Carruthers caveat. The northern-most homes of Glenora face cul-de-sacs designed in the post-war boom of the 1950s.


The Alberta Government opened the Royal Alberta Museum in 1967 on the site of the Lieutenant-Governor’s residence. Due to the exclusive nature of the area’s residences, which were constructed with dancing, dining, and formal entertainment in mind, the museum is the only purpose-built cultural and entertainment facility in the neighbourhood.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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Dr Robert Wells Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The historical Dr Robert Wells Residence is located at 10328 Connaught Drive in Glenora Edmonton. The Wells Residence is an irregular plan, one-and-a-half-storey house with a detached coach house, in Glenora west of downtown.



The Wells Residence was built in 1911, is significant as representative of houses that were built in upper-class communities in Edmonton. Located in this exclusive neighbourhood has attracted businessmen and professionals who could afford grand homes such as this residence. This house, with its detached coach house and formal setting, is a good example of the scale and grandeur of contemporary houses built in the area.


The heritage value and architecture is significant for their Arts and Crafts design. Influenced by the popularity of the style in Britain, the Arts and Crafts movement was quickly adopted in Western Canada and became a prominent style in affluent residential neighbourhoods of most major cities. Typified by hand-crafted materials and irregular massing, the Wells residence is an excellent example of the style.


The Wells Residence is also significant because of its association with its former owner, Dr Robert B. Wells, a professor of Ophthalmology and respected eye surgeon, he was also known as a community leader and served in senior posts with several community organizations, including as president of the  Museum of the Arts,  Canadian Club of Edmonton, and as a member of the University of Alberta Senate. The former Wells Pavilion at the University of Alberta Hospital was named in his honour.


Character defining elements of this Glenoa homes are the building’s Arts and Crafts style, clinker brick detailing on the main floor, horizontal wood-lapped siding and gable roof and dormers with cedar roof shingles, exposed rafters and brackets under eaves, multi-pane wood sash casement windows, including multiple dormer, gable and living room windows with vertical mullions and the separate coach house with matching brick and cross gable roof and window panes.


Surprisingly, for one of our historic homes, Dr Robert Wells Residence has some sales history. Back in 1985, when interest rates were at a high point, it sold for $269,000. In 2015, this Glenora house sold for $1,150,000 by one of our Edmonton Remax Realtors. For more information or to learn the value of your Glenora Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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Gibbons Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The Gibbons Residence is located in Glenora Edmonton near Oliver Square at 10534 - 125 Street. It was the retirement home of one of Edmonton's more colorful individuals. James Gibbons was born on Christmas day 1837 in Holly Hill, Donegal Ireland, and immigrated to America in 1856. Over the next nine years, he participated in various gold rushes in California, British Columbia, Idaho, and Montana. His arrival in Edmonton in the mid-1860s followed reports of gold discoveries in the area.



In the mid-1860s through to his retirement from the position of Indian Agent at Stony Plain in 1908 Gibbons played a variety of roles in the economic and administrative life of Edmonton. He mined gold on the North Saskatchewan River, traded furs, and homesteaded land that now makes up Edmonton's Laurier Park. Following his retirement in 1908, he purchased the property for the construction of this house that was completed in 1911.


The Gibbons Residence is modeled after Georgian Revival residential designs that were popular across Canada and the United States from the 1880s through 1915. Characteristics of this classically derived style in the brick Gibbons house include its symmetry, its hipped roof, the broad overhand with brackets under the eaves, a central doorway, and a veranda supported by twin box columns.


This vintage Glenora house sold in 1990 for $210,000 then again in 2010 for $740,000. For more information or to learn the value of your Glenora Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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The Ferris Residence

Historical Edmonton Homes

The Ferris Residence is located at 12704 - 102 Avenue on the edge of Glenora Edmonton across from Historic Stark Oak Tree at the Royal Alberta Museum.



This home was one of the original 'mansions' of Old Glenora. Located directly across from Government House, it boasts a spectacular view of the river valley from upstairs. In 1911, this large brick house was built close to the Iron Bridge was intended for use both as a single-family dwelling as well as the inclusion of an office for his medical practice.


Dr. Ferris, one of our leading physicians, died from heart failure in August of 1927. Originally from Shelbourne, Ontario, came to the city in 1902 when he established his practice but was also prominent on the school board and he was a member of the first senate at the University of Alberta. He served as chief medical officer of the Shorncliff Military Hospital in England during World War One and at the conclusion, returned to Edmonton to continue his practice. His widow continued to live in the house and she was also active in many civic affairs through the Local Council of Women. She served as the first female superintendent of Canteens for the United Kingdom Canteen Board during the First World War and died in January 1962.


After Mrs. Ferris' death, the Glenora house was sold to the Catholic order of St. Alphonsus Liguori, the Redemptorists, who used the house as a residence and the provincial headquarters for western Canada.


There are no MLS sales reporting data for this historical Glenora house in west-central Edmonton. For more information or to learn the value of your Glenora Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

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What classifies as a luxury Edmonton home?

Luxury home prices vary from city to province to state to country. What classifies a home in the luxury market consists of a few variables. Luxury homes are no longer based on price alone. To classify property into the luxury home category, it mush have desired indulgences. A home can be considered "a luxury property" when it offers these features:



  • A grand foyer with soaring ceilings to greet your guests.
  • Adequate nanny/guest living quarters which are private and away from the main living area.
  • Personal conveniences and amenities such as pools, in-home gyms, Imax movie theatres, arcade rooms, wine cellars, decontamination showers, backyard tennis courts, solarium, and game rooms. There are several homes in Edmonton with personal amenities which can be found in Cameron Heights and Glenora.
  • State of the art kitchens. With duel ovens, smart refrigerators to keep track of your food items, wine storage, ample counter space, built-in computer screens.
  • Technology. Homes controlled with voice activation or the touch of a bottom from anywhere in the world are now one of the must-haves with elite buyers.
  • Privacy. Many elite home buyers require privacy, especially media icons who get accosted by paparazzi.
  • A prime location. A view is one of the things that make homes fall into the luxury category no matter where you live. It can be an unobstructed view of a mountain, beachfront, or overlooking the sparkling lights of the city. Beachfront properties in Edmonton can be found in Summerside.
  • Premier quality, reputable builders and renowned architect. The construction materials, lighting, finishes, appliances, and design all must be a cut above what's considered standard. Dominate renowned Edmonton communities include Griesbach and Windermere.

A luxury home can mean different things to different people. Bottom line, a luxury home is where you can relax and retreat from the rest of the world, enjoying a dwelling that fits your lifestyle. View our Edmonton luxury homes for sale by the district. 

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