Home > Edmonton Communities > Heritage Valley Edmonton

Welcome to Heritage Valley Edmonton

Heritage Valley is one of Edmonton's largest and newest districts located in far south Edmonton established in 2001. There are currently 14 communities in total including Allard, Blackmud Creek, Callaghan, Cavanagh, Desrochers, Chappelle, Graydon Hill, Hays Ridge, Heritage Valley Town Centre, MacEwan, Paisley, Richford and Rutherford.  Plus the future community of Cashman. Although nearby, Blackburne does not form part of the Heritage Valley. It is bounded by 170th Street NW, 41st Avenue SW, Ellerslie Road.


Heritage Valley Edmonton Image


The nearby Currents of Windermere and Southgate shopping centres offer a variety of retail, dining, and medical and dental options. The Heritage Valley Town Centre will also provide many new shopping opportunities when construction is complete. Close proximity to the Anthony Henday, as well as the major bounding roadways, provides residents with access to amenities throughout the city.


The international Airport, Jagare Ridge Golf Club and South Edmonton Common are also nearby.

Each community in the Heritage Valley area has plenty of green spaces, and walking trails for homeowners to enjoy. Most of the Streets in the Heritage Valley Area are named after Edmontonians. There is also a new future hospital with plans underway and plans to extend the LRT.


Callaghan, Richford and Rutherford are the most prestigious communities in the Heritage Valley Area, while Allard and Blackmud Creek feature more value per square foot than other Heritage Valley area homes. View homes for sale in the Heritage Valley.

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Home > Edmonton Communities > Best Place to Live for Dog Owners

Communities for Edmonton Dog Lovers

Edmonton has over 40 dog park and off-leash areas where your best friend can run and play without having you on the other end of the leash. You too can get physical and emotional benefits from exercise and by socializing with other dog owners.


Edmonton Communities with Dog Parks Image


My top 3 places to live for Edmonton dog owners are near


Buena Vista - Great Meadow: A large off-leash dog park near the valley zoo, north of Laurier Park and south of Melton Ravine in the Glenora area. The Buena Vista Dog Park features an open off-leash area, access to the river valley for those dogs who love to swim, park benches, ample parking and river valley trails with maps for walking and cycling. Note* No smoking or vaping tobacco or cannabis in this park.


Hermitage Point South located between 129 Avenue and 137 Avenue, 22 Street and the River Valley in northeast Edmonton. It features plenty of natural walking trails, picnic sites, Ambassador, portable toilets, seasonal summer fishing and a large off-leash dog area. Our Edmonton Ambassadors at the Hermitage Park Dog Park help improve the quality of our off-leash areas, and enhance the user experience for human and canine visitors by encouraging positive interactions, and creating a culture of community at the park. Homes near the Hermitage Point South Dog Park are very reasonably priced. 


Terwillegar Dog Park in southwest Edmonton accessible via Rabbit Hill in the Riverbend District. Although the Terwillegar Dog Park is a multi-use area, it is most popular for pet lovers with larger canines. This park also has a 262-metre-long footbridge that links the park to Oleskiw River Valley Park on the north side of the river, perfect for long strolls with your best friend.


For other dog parks near you, visit Edmonton's off-leash dog parks

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Home > Edmonton Communities > Luxury Communities

What classifies an Edmonton home as luxury?

Luxury home prices vary from city to province to state to country. What classifies a home in the luxury market consists of a few variables. Luxury homes are no longer based on price alone. To classify property into the luxury home category, it mush have desired indulgences. A home can be considered "a luxury property" when it offers these features:


Edmonton Luxury Homes Image


  • A grand foyer with soaring ceilings to greet your guests.
  • Adequate nanny/guest living quarters which are private and away from the main living area.
  • Personal conveniences and amenities such as pools, in-home gyms, Imax movie theatres, arcade rooms, wine cellars, decontamination showers, backyard tennis courts, solarium, and game rooms. There are several homes in Edmonton with personal amenities which can be found in Cameron Heights and Glenora.
  • State of the art kitchens. With duel ovens, smart refrigerators to keep track of your food items, wine storage, ample counter space, built-in computer screens.
  • Technology. Homes controlled with voice activation or the touch of a bottom from anywhere in the world are now one of the must-haves with elite buyers.
  • Privacy. Many elite home buyers require privacy, especially media icons who get accosted by paparazzi.
  • A prime location. A view is one of the things that make homes fall into the luxury category no matter where you live. It can be an unobstructed view of a mountain, beachfront, or overlooking the sparkling lights of the city. Beachfront properties in Edmonton can be found in Summerside.
  • Premier quality, reputable builders and renowned architect. The construction materials, lighting, finishes, appliances, and design all must be a cut above what's considered standard. Dominate renowned Edmonton communities include Griesbach and Windermere.

A luxury home can mean different things to different people. Bottom line, a luxury home is where you can relax and retreat from the rest of the world, enjoying a dwelling which fits your lifestyle.

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Home > Edmonton Communities > 2019 New Edmonton Communities

Looking for new homes in southwest Edmonton?

New homes now selling in Riverview, Uplands and Stillwater are now selling.


New Edmonton Homes for Sale Image



Riverview located at the outer ridges of southwest Edmonton is now building. Similar to the rural West Big Lake district, the Riverview community is nestled away from the big city, south of the Grange and features an urban lifestyle, lined with trees along the Wedgewood Creek ravines. This up and coming community will be filled with the amenities of a modern city including playgrounds, parks, recreation and walking trails integrated with new and modern homes, a variety of restaurants, shops and services.


House prices in Riverview will range from starter home prices to the multi-millions. Also known as River's Edge - the Riverview Area offers some of the cities best country residential homes. The Edgemont community features houses and attached dwellings built in 2016 and later. Residential construction of Uplands and Stillwater is already underway and will be the hottest new home district in Edmonton in 2019 & 2020. View currently listed Riverview homes for sale.

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Home > Edmonton Communities > Riverbend Edmonton

Riverbend Edmonton - An Extraordinary Place to Live

Riverbend is one of the best places to live in southwest Edmonton surrounded by mother nature. It is divided into two parts - Old Riverbend on the west and new Riverbend on the east. Riverbend is located off of Terwillegar drive a few minutes from the University of Alberta.


House prices in Riverbend Edmonton range from move-up to luxurious home prices. Old Riverbend is located on the west side of Terwillegar Drive and includes the communities of Brander Gardens, Brookside, Ramsay Heights, and Rhatigan Ridge.



The newer part of Riverbend is located on the west side of Terwillegar Drive, bounded by Whitemud Creek Ravine and 23 Avenue NW offering homeowners here breathtaking and beautiful scenery year-round. This part of Riverbend includes the communities of Bulyea Heights, Carter Crest, Falconer Heights, Henderson Estates, and Ogilvie Ridge.


Bulyea Heights offers more walking trails than any other Riverbend community and with the presence of the Whitemud Creek Ravine, which runs the eastern length of Bulyea Heights, is the most striking community. Almost every house in Bulyea Heights is owner-occupied with several of these homes touching the edges of the ravines with more walking trails, natural paths for hiking and run-off streams from the North Saskatchewan River. Bulyea Heights was named after George Hedley Vicars Bulyea, the first Lieutenant-Governor of Alberta.


Carter Crest is a smaller upper-class Riverbend community features a combination of single-detached housing, construction prior to 1990s. There are only a few roads in this community which swirl and curve to limit the negative effects of traffic, maximize land space and allows its homeowners bigger lots. Carter Crest is within walking distance to the Terwillegar Recreation Center and is named after Robert I. Carter, a Canadian government agent who advised Americans on their immigration prospects in Canada.


Falconer Heights is one of the few Riverbend communities which offer several amenities including a medical centre, a library, fast food restaurants, banks, and more located in Riverbend Square. This portion of Riverbend is popular with the ageing community and features a fantastic retirement community. There is no school site located within Falconer Heights, but there is a large future school/park site adjacent to Henderson Estates. It was named after James F. Falconer, who was involved in the formation of the Edmonton Names Advisory Committee in the mid-1950s.


The Henderson Estates is nestled between Old Riverbend and Haddow in Terwillegar Heights bounded by the River Valley which runs the length of the community, providing homeowners with excellent access to our greatest natural asset. Due to the natural beauty and breath-taking views, many of these Henderson Estates properties will run into the multi-million dollar price range. Henderson Estates is named after Thomas Henderson, a homesteader in the Riverbend area in the late 19th century who imported Italian honey bees to his farm.


When originally built, Ogilvie Ridge was to be a private, elite, gated community until the city decided, Edmonton against any gated communities. It is bordered by Bulyea Heights, Whitemud Creek ravine, and west by the Rabbit Hill. Ogilvie Ridge features a natural topography with an integration of the North Saskatchewan River Valley ravine system defining this community. Ogilvie Ridge was named after James H. Ogilvie, a politician, a lawyer, and a veteran of World War I.


View Riverbend Edmonton homes for sale

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Home > Edmonton Communities > Old Riverbend Edmonton

Old Riverbend Edmonton - A Favorite Place to Live

Riverbend is one of the best places to live in Edmonton. It is divided into two parts - East and west of Terwillegar Drive. House prices range from move-up to luxurious home prices. Unlike any other district in the city, Riverbend offers it's homeowners plenty of mother natures natural scenic beauty with community walking paths and river valley access all within walking distance. Old Riverbend is well known for the popular footbridge which runs across the river to Edmonton West via walking paths.


Riverbend consists of nine communities. The new part of Riverbend is located on the east side of Terwillegar Drive and includes the communities of Bulyea Heights, Carter Crest, Falconer Heights, Henderson Estates, and Ogilvie Ridge.

Living in Old Riverbend

Old Riverbend is located on the west side of Terwillegar Drive, bounded by Rabbit Hill. North Saskatchewan River and includes Brander GardensBrooksideRamsay Heights, and Rhatigan Ridge.



Rhatigan Ridge was first subdivided in 1980 with various house styles from large luxury homes on spacious lots, especially near the edges of the river valley to a range of more modest executive-style houses. Rhatigan Ridge encompasses the Riverbend community league beside St. Mary Catholic School and features a high point of land with panoramic views south of Riverbend Road. Rhatigan Ridge was named after of Thomas Rhatigan, a farmer who was famous for the quality of his wheat and oats and was proclaimed World Oat King at the Royal Winter Fair three times.


Brander Gardens offers more deserve homeownership with plenty of townhouse and apartment condominiums to choose from. When originally built, the majority of these condos were focused on the upper-class and elite. Located in the western portion of Brander Gardens are some of Edmonton's most magnificent properties, originally called Glamorgan. Homeowners here are treated with the proximity to the Fort Edmonton Walking trails and Footbridge which crosses to the Wolf Willow Ravine. Brander Gardens was named in honour of George Brander, who established a peony garden in the Bonnie Doon until the 1940s.


Brookside, nestled away from the rest of Riverbend bounded by Whitemud Creek Ravine North with scenic views of our Downtown. Most houses in Brookside are executive style homes constructed in the 1970s with above average-sized lots and mature landscaping. Brookside homeowners enjoy the natural woodland habitat, skiing at the Snow Valley Ski Club and Rainbow Valley Park, access to river valley park trails, and other recreational facilities.


Ramsay Heights is Riverbend's oldest community located in a prime real estate location and features a mix of housing equally split between single-family houses and condominiums. Ramsay Heights offers a high elevation vantage point with panoramic views of Edmonton. A large portion of the detached houses in Ramsay Heights runs along the river Valley on 154 Street and Whitemud Road. There are also a few luxury houses located in the original Glamorgan subdivision adjacent to the river valley. Ramsay Heights was named for Walter Ramsay, a principal at McKay Avenue and Queen Avenue School, then became the cities first commercial florist.


View more homes for sale in the Riverbend Edmonton District.

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Home > Edmonton Communities > About Edmonton

Buying a home in Edmonton Alberta

Finding a home in Edmonton is not an easy task. Unlike most cities, Edmonton's real estate is extremely sporadic. The best way to choose a home in Edmonton is to first choose your lifestyle. Then choose a REALTOR® who specializes in the community you want to live in. For military members posted to our CFB - Canadian Forces, Base Garrison click here


Find a Great Edmonton REALTOR® here!

About Edmonton

In 1904, Edmonton was declared a city. The following year Edmonton was named the provincial capital of Alberta. Today, Edmonton is Canada's 6th largest city, offering all the amenities of a major urban centre plus a family-friendly environment that is safe, stimulating and rich with opportunity. Edmonton is one of Canada's most ethnically diverse cities with more than 60 ethnic and cultural groups. Well known for its vibrant cultural life, diverse business community and outstanding river valley park system, Edmonton is a great place to call home. People who live in Edmonton are called "Edmontonians"

Edmonton Geography

Edmonton is located near the geographical middle of the province at an elevation of 668 meters. The terrain in and around Edmonton is generally flat to gently rolling, with ravines and deep river valleys, such as the North Saskatchewan River valley. Despite the Canadian Rockies lying as close to Edmonton as roughly 220 kilometres to the southwest, the city is too distant for any of its peaks to be seen from even its tallest buildings. The North Saskatchewan River bisects the city and originates at the Columbia Ice field in Jasper National Park. It empties, via the Saskatchewan River, Lake Winnipeg, and the Nelson River, into Hudson Bay. It runs from the southwest to the northeast and is fed by numerous creeks throughout the city, such as Mill Creek and Whitemud Creek. This creates numerous ravines, many of which have been incorporated into the urban parkland. Edmonton is situated at the boundary between prairie to the south and boreal forest to the north, in a transitional area known as aspen parkland. However, the aspen parkland in and around Edmonton has long since been heavily altered by farming and other human activities, such as oil and natural gas exploration.

Edmonton Climate

Edmontonians have a famous saying here - "If you don't like the weather, wait five minutes" Edmonton has a northern continental climate with extreme seasonal temperatures. It has mild summers and chilly winters, with the average daily temperatures ranging from -11.7°C (10.9°F) in January to 17.5°C (63.5°F) in July. New Buyers to Edmonton sometimes ask "When does it snow in Edmonton." Truth be told - Edmonton has had snow in every month.

Edmonton History

Edmonton around 3,000 BC and perhaps as early as 10,000 BC, when an ice-free corridor opened up as the last ice age ended and timber, water, and wildlife became available in the region. In 1754, Anthony Henday, an explorer working for the Hudson's Bay Company, may have been the first European to enter the Edmonton area. His expeditions across the Canadian Prairies were mainly to seek contact with the aboriginal population for the purpose of establishing fur trade, as the competition was fierce between the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company. By 1795, Fort Edmonton was established as a major trading post for the Hudson's Bay Company. It was named after the English hometown, now a part of Greater London, of the HBC deputy governor Sir James Winter Lake. In the late nineteenth century, the highly fertile soils surrounding Edmonton helped attract settlers, further establishing Edmonton as a major regional commercial and agricultural building. Edmonton was also a stopping point for people hoping to cash in on the Klondike Gold Rush in 1897, although the majority of people doing so chose to take a steamship north to the Yukon from Vancouver. Incorporated as a city in 1904 with a population of 8,350, Edmonton became the capital of Alberta a year later on September 1, 1905.

The war years


During the early 1910s, Edmonton grew very rapidly due to rising speculation in real estate prices. In 1912, Edmonton amalgamated with the city of Strathcona south of the North Saskatchewan River. As a result, the city extended south of the river. Just prior to World War I, the real estate boom ended suddenly, causing the city's population to decline sharply from over 72,500 in 1914 to under 54,000 only two years later. Recruitment to the Canadian military during the war also contributed to the drop in population. Afterwards, the city was slow to recover in population and economy during the twenties and thirties, until World War II.


The oil boom years


The first major oil discovery in Alberta was made on February 13, 1947, near the town of Leduc to the south of Edmonton. As early as 1914, oil reserves were known to exist in the southern parts of Alberta but they produced very little oil compared to those around Edmonton. Additional oil reserves were discovered during the late forties and the fifties near the town of Redwater. Because most of Alberta's oil reserves were concentrated in central and northern Alberta, Edmonton became home to most of Alberta's oil industry.

The subsequent oil boom gave Edmonton new status as the Oil Capital of Canada. During the fifties, the city increased in population from 149,000 to 269,000. After a relatively calm but still prosperous period in the sixties, the city's growth took on renewed vigour with high world oil prices, triggered by the 1973 oil crisis and the 1979 Iranian Revolution. The oil boom of the seventies and eighties ended abruptly with the sharp decline in oil prices on the international market and the introduction of the National Energy Program in 1981. The population had reached 521,000 that same year. Although the National Energy Program was later scrapped by the federal government in the mid-eighties, the collapse of world oil prices in 1986 and massive government cutbacks kept the city from making a full economic recovery until the late nineties.


Recent history


In 1981, West Edmonton Mall, which was at the time the world's largest mall, opened. Still the biggest in North America, the mall is one of Alberta's most-visited tourist attractions and contains an indoor amusement park, a large indoor water park, a skating rink, a New Orleans-themed bar district and a luxury hotel in addition to over eight hundred shops and services. On July 31, 1987, a devastating tornado, ranked as an F4 on the Fujita scale hit the city and killed twenty-seven people. The storm blew CN rail cars off a bridge crossing the North Saskatchewan River and hit the areas of Beaumont, Mill Woods, Bannerman, Fraser, and the Evergreen Trailer Park. The day became known as "Black Friday". Then-mayor Laurence Decore cited the community's response to the tornado as evidence that Edmonton was a "city of champions", which later became the city's slogan. The city entered its current period of economic recovery and prosperity by the late nineties, helped by a strong recovery in oil prices and further economic diversification. While oil production and refining remains the basis of many jobs in Edmonton, the city's economy has managed to diversify significantly. The downtown core and parts of the inner city, after years of extremely high office vacancy rates and neglect, have recovered to a great degree. It is still undergoing a renaissance of its own, with further new projects underway or about to become reality, and more people choosing to live in or near the downtown core. This economic prosperity is bringing in large numbers of workers from around Canada. It is forecast that 83,000 new residents will move to Edmonton between 2006 and 2010, twice the rate that city planners had expected. Many of the new workers moving to the city are young men. Information from Wikipedia.

Edmonton Education

Edmonton has become one of Canada's major educational centres with more than 60,000 full-time post-secondary students spread over several institutions and campuses (total enrollment between the schools is as high as 170,000, which includes students enrolled in multiple institutions). The University of Alberta (known colloquially as the "U of A"), whose main campus is situated on the south side of Edmonton's river valley, is a board-governed, public institution. The main campus consists of more than ninety buildings on 890,000 square meters (220 acres) of land, with buildings dating back to the university's establishment in 1908.


K-12


Edmonton has three publicly funded school boards (districts), who provide kindergarten and grades one through twelve. The vast majority of students attend schools in the two large English language boards: Edmonton Public Schools and the separate Edmonton Catholic School District. Also, since 1994, the francophone minority community has had their own school board based in Edmonton, the North-Central Francophone School Authority, which includes surrounding communities. Most recently the city has seen a small number of public charter schools open, independent of any board. All three school boards and public charter schools are funded through provincial grants and property taxes.

Edmonton Real Estate

CREA - Canadian Real Estate Association

Realtor.ca - Multiple Listing Service

AREA - Alberta Real Estate Association

EREB - Edmonton Real Estate Board

CMHC - Canada Mortgage & Housing Corporation

AMBA - Alberta Mortgage Brokers Association

CAHPI - Canadian Association of Home & Property Inspectors 

City Crime Check -Edmonton Police Crime map

Our Real Estate Blog - Edmonton Real Estate Blog

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Data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton.