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Buttercup Farm House - Highlands Edmonton

Buttercup Farm House

Historical Edmonton Homes

The Buttercup Farm House at 11243 58 Street NW in Highlands was built in 1912 as a two-storey residence with a side-facing gable roof, a wide gable-roofed front dormer, a full-length front verandah and a second storey balcony. It is clad in clapboard siding and wooden shingles and has an attached single car garage and occupies a single city lot in this north Edmonton community.



Built in 1912, the Buttercup Farm House is significant for its design, reflecting design principles popular before the First World War., as well as its association with the development policies of Magrath and Holgate in the Highlands subdivision.


During the first decade of the 1900s residential construction in our city favoured simple designs, prized natural materials and minimized decorations which at the time were considered by many to be useless. The practical application of this trend in design is evident in the composition of the Buttercup Farm House, which employed contrasting clapboard siding and cedar shingle cladding, both natural elements readily available at the time. Functional elements which added detail to the house while not compromising the desire for simplicity included the scuppers in the verandah and balcony and the large pillars supporting the shed roof over the verandah. The sculpted rafters under the eaves and similarly shaped brackets under the projecting window on the north elevation allude to the home’s structure and contribute to the popular principle of honesty in design. Buttercup Farm House is valued for embodying the design ethos of Edmontonians in the period before the First World War.


Highlands was established in 1910 by real estate speculators William J. Magrath and Bidwell Holgate as an upscale community for Edmonton. They primarily subdivided lots and sold them to owners on the condition that the resulting houses have a minimum construction cost of $2,500. The early houses resulting from this development policy were all similar to Buttercup Farm House, and typically had large square footprints, were two storeys in height, and employed wood frame construction with clapboard and cedar shingle cladding. As one of the better surviving examples the home now makes an important contribution to the character of the neighbourhood.


Character-defining elements of the Buttercup Farm House are timber single siding on the first and second levels separated from clapboard siding and corner boards below the ground floor window sill level with a timber belt course with side-facing gable roof with large central gable on the front and rear elevations. Other characteristics of this home area an open verandah, shed roof supported by heavy brick and timber columns with upper brackets which is wider than the roof with brick columns at each end. Exposed beams and tongue and groove ceiling detail and open balcony on top of the porch with wide trimmed door opening and rail enclosed with timber shingles. The lower rail is enclosed with timber siding down to ground level with an off-centre wooden front door, exposed rafters and tongue and groove sheathing under the eaves and a brick chimney stack.


The Buttercup Farm House was last sold in 2019 for $595,000. For more information or to learn the value of your Highlands Edmonton homes, contact us at 780-910-5179.


Sources:

https://www.edmontonmapsheritage.ca/

https://www.edmontonsarchitecturalheritage.ca/

Edmonton Houses and Homes
Direct: 780-910-5179
Office: 780-237-7074
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Data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton.